An appeal from John Moran

Friends of Florida,

Our waters are a mess. That’s not news; that’s the new normal in Florida.

Our world-class springs—once stunning and blue—are now murky, polluted, and green. How did we get here? There are many factors but under state and federal law, corporate profits are prioritized over the health of our rivers and springs. The results are plainly visible in reduced flows and increased algae growth. These conditions are harming our public waters and the Floridan aquifer, which is the drinking water source for millions of Floridians. 

The Santa Fe River Bill of Rights campaign (SAFEBOR) is part of a visionary global movement to fundamentally change our relationship with Mother Earth. We’re a local grassroots political action committee working to amend Alachua County’s Home Rule Charter to recognize the right of the Santa Fe River to naturally exist and flourish, and to assert our community’s right to a healthy river ecosystem and aquifer.

 If voters approve, Alachua will become the first county in the state to enact Rights of Nature into its County Charter. Other counties are poised to follow. The eyes of Florida will be upon us—but first we must collect 18,094 signed petitions from Alachua County voters by Feb. 21 to get on the ballot. That’s a tall order but with your support we can accomplish this goal. Let’s Protect the Santa Fe River: Here’s how you can take action now…

  • Sign the petition to put the SAFEBOR initiative on the 2020 Alachua County ballot
  • Volunteer to ask friends and neighbors to sign the petition.
  • Donate. Political campaigns are expensive. If you love the river, please put your money where your heart is.

People have a voice. Corporations have a voice. Why not the River?
Our public waters are a public trust. Protecting them is the right thing to do. Let’s all be a Voice for the River! 

And please share this message with your friends across Alachua County and beyond.

(Paid political ad by SAFEBOR political action campaign)

2019 Summer of Slime Photo Tour

A photo essay by John Moran

Nature is speaking. Are we listening?